Today is Armed Forces Remembrance Day. By Oshaloto Joseph Tade 

Today is Armed Forces Remembrance Day.
Our soldiers are us. They are brave strong and ever ready. They are the expendibles who clean up our mess. In the manner unequaled, unrivaled and lethal. They give their lives for us.
While they have not had reasons to engage in international warfare in our defense, they have had to grapple with intense battles particularly in the Northeastern part of the country. There, an army of insurgents with surprising military power and intelligence sought to overrun our nation. Thank God for our fairly motivated military. 
Typically, warfare takes huge toll on any nation that gets caught by it. Money, infrastructure and lives are spent. 
One would have wished no more war faced Nigeria after the heavy loss incurred in the last civil war that almost consumed us in 1967-70. Sadly this misfortune still visited Nigeria just 50 years later.
Just as the Nigerian Civil War was avoidable, the BokoHaram war, in which scores of our brothers and sisters in arms have died, is also avoidable.
Thank God we are winning the war – its costs in human and financial resources notwithstanding.
While we honor our gallant armed forces today, we, particularly our leaders, must make a diagnosis of what the causes of these costly misadventures are. We must prevent anything that will make citizens take up arms against the state. This must be a deliberate course of action.


We must recognize that the biggest honor we can give a person – dead or alive – is to give them quality of life while they yet live. Therefore, I call on the government to look into how the personnel of our country’s armed forces will enjoy better working/living conditions.
Recreational facilities, wages, accommodation, prompt payments of their benefits etc. must be given adequate attention.
Happy Armed Forces Remembrance Day
Oshaloto Joseph Tade.
Photo: courtesy Cool FM 

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Get you out of Shitholia, Hey! 

Did I feel embarrassed about the alleged (which’s proved to be fake) shithole remarks? Absolutely! 
But the question is, who really insulted me? Mr. Trump you might say. Well, this is where you and I may very fiercely disagree. Though I wouldn’t even mind you. 
Some months ago, my friend lost his mom to an illness. She couldn’t access basic healthcare owing to the backlog of salary owed her by the government she’s served all her life. 
Sadly, there’s no documentation for of her (and others like her who are victims of poor governance) for possible posthumous recognition in future. 
The embarrassment that we have all felt by this development must be taken hold of for deliberate engagement for national development. 
Overall, the music legend Mr. Edrees Abdulkareem has been justified. His masterpiece ‘Nigeria jagajaga’ may be nearing some two decades, it’s relevance is still staring at us nakedly in the face.

Trump? Forget him? By; Oshaloto Joseph Tade 

Trump? Forget him. 
I don’t like it when we get so fixated with President Donald J. Trump who is clearly doing well with the mandate the American people have given him.
Whatever the guy says about Nigeria are quite hard to fault – of course by people who regard facts. They must spur us to getting more serious with destiny. 
In any case, his government is of more benefit to Nigeria than his immediate predecessor’s who believed it was cool to let BokoHaram continue their carnage against the innocent Nigerians by refusing to sell us military hardwares which we needed so badly. 
I hear Trump has okayed robust military support for our armed forces. Where then is the legitimacy of our bitterness? 
Attempts to rubbish the person of Mr. Trump who is merely stating the facts are lamely. Such attempts only show that we are not ready to take back our country which is clearly on the precipice. 
With due regards to the leadership of the country, I contend that should they put as much passion, competence and love to governance, our Bureau of Statistics by now will be rolling out more encouraging figures in; security, jobs, school enrollment, cleared salaries, manufacturing etc. 
We may wish to refer to Trump’s performance on these fronts – as applicable. 
Nigeria, let your pointling focus on where your troubles truly lie. 
Build your country. 
Oshaloto, Joseph Tade.

Will Kaduna rule the World? By Oshaloto, Joseph Tade. 

Will Kaduna rule the World?

By Oshaloto, Joseph Tade.
If anyone thinks it’s OK to perpetuate unqualified and/or incompetent manpower in our public schools, such a person, and I’m sorry to say, is the reason why certain aspects of civil liberty must be suspended.
The government must devise means of ensuring that we don’t spend the inheritance of future generations – even when we have been largely corrupted by petty politics, greed and total disregard for the future that lay ahead of us.
Our school children are the future upon which much of today’s investment largely depend. The army of miscreants down south and BokoHaram recruits up North are clear evidences of a failed education system.
Nasir El-Rufai is a man I consider as having a foresight that is beyond the bigger majority. His vision transcends cheap blackmails and pettiness bandied around.

Abuja is largely regarded as a model city because the young man El-Rufai insisted that structures be planted in conformity with the masterplan. Rogues who didn’t believe in the need to do things right got their houses pulled down. Yes. And sanity was restored.
Today, the Kaduna people have two choices before them. The choice to make history and the choice to kill history.
They have the choice to demonstrate their love for their children and their children’s children. The choice to redeem their future. They have the choice to show the world that they are tough enough to swallow a bitter pill today so that they can birth a new Kaduna that will rule the world.
Kaduna, choose this rough path. Choose it. It’s one of the best legacy you’ll bequeath to the children the Almighty has given you.
Oshaloto, Joseph Tade.

Co-founder Muboson Total Media Ltd.

Hillside Plaza, Plot 1901, Yakubu Gowon Crescent, Asokoro. Abuja.

oshalototade@yahoo.com

Matters Nigeriana may wear you out. By Oshaloto, Joseph Tade. 

Matters Nigeriana may wear you out.By Oshaloto, Joseph Tade. 
Of course Nigeria will wear you out if you try to roll along its wheels of tensions, injustices, unpaid wages, incessant strikes, insecurity, lies etc. So, for every single thing you find cherishing in Nigeria, I urge you to place a firm grip on it. Enjoy it. 
Call it a kool-aid. But I don’t so much care. For me it’s a smart way of staying cool and retaining what’s left of your sanity as a Nigerian. Moreover, this is a new year and prayers are on. You must let the angel meet nice confessions on your lips.
Prayers are on I warn. So don’t be caught ‘complaining’ about your country’s sordid mess. Don’t deplore its despicable calibration of sociopolitical and economic realities. If you do, ah, oti gbá penalty lọ throwing nìyẹn o.
While taking my time trying to remain a ‘law abiding’, zombied, see-no-wrong sort of citizen, the unlawful incarceration of IG Wala, the convener of CATBAN hit me.
Late last year I was in company of friends in Kaduna and the Wala-muktar question came up. There were doubt about the possibility of such massive corruption in an organization directly overseeing movements of believers to the holy land. Others whose knowledge of the Nigerian corruption architecture had no problem agreeing with IG Wala’s claims. There was another hypothesis, which was that, perhaps the holy Alhaji actually stole those billions and refused to appropriately ‘shake bodi’.
Or, like his principal, incompetence had so possessed him that so much was looted under his nose without him knowing. Our love for country kept us talking about the wantonness of the Nigerian powerholders. 
What we didn’t see coming was a vindictive, traitement extrajudiciaire of Mr. Wala. I had even surmised the case would naturally die – as usual; the billionaire thief (if he truly stole) goes home with his billions while IG looks for other things to waste his ink on.
I will by every means regard IG Wala as an elite Nigerian. One who has written, shouted and whistled himself into prominence. So his rift will the Hajj Commission boss, I’d thought, wasn’t something one should lose sleep over. But of course an overriding reality that the handsome social influencer is a Nigerian and a brother-in-pen got me somewhat concerned.
His involvement in active (and sometimes partisan) mobilization and general social entrepreneurship has earned him immense mention not only among the media savvy but also amongst the powers that be in Nigeria. 
So, by every social index, the man IG is a big name. And he’s a lot feared by the powers that be. Not withstanding a recent pecuniary embarrassment his image suffered last year, IG Wala is a figure which the corrupt Nigerian elites are sometimes uncomfortable with.
I do not know the person of Mr. Muktar, the NAHCON boss. But I do know that he’s probably not saintlier than other largely rouging government appointees who neither have no regard for the sanctity of billions of the Nigerian Naira nor a shred of affection towards the Nigerian people.
In my opinion, he and his likes must be spared no rest by every Nigerian if the culture of accountability, transparency and probity must be enshrined in the polity.
What statistics say at the moment is that government people are guilty until declared innocent by the bench.
My conclusion is actually the core of this whole update.
IG Wala was effectively kidnapped. Slammed in detention and prevented access to his lawyers. Apparently at the behest of the powers that be.
This abuse of the state apparatus against citizens (which they exist to protect and dignify) is a commonplace in our country Nigeria. You and I know this. Thank God IG Wala’s unlawful incarceration has brought to light this dangerous part of us. You get promptly rounded up simply because someguy doesn’t like you. You’re locked up, manhandled and stripped of your dignity because there is a system so messed up that it’s police, poorly trained, poorly remunerated are all out to serve the interest of the bigger animals while meting out unimaginable savagery on the smaller.
Little wonder even Baba would do anything to remain a lion. The system considers the monkeys and the baboons the expendables. Aren’t they? 
My sympathy is largely for the Nigerian who has no one to stand up for him; to hashtag for him; to hold a walk for him. My heart goes to you dear Nigerian you’re so lonely. Fulani herdsmen kill you for a spot. They mess you up. The ones you voted for don’t give a hoot about whether you live or die. But you don’t know.
Your Facebook updates say so.
Your Twits confirm my fears for you. You’re frolicking while your Rome is being burnt. 
IG Wala has got a huge following. We searched him out. Unraveled the alleged Muktar – Police conspiracy against him and are optimistic that he will thoroughly floor his accuser in the court.
But you, you ordinary Nigerian. You who chant sai Buhari, you who chant GEJ for life. You who have pre-offered your life for the victory of APC or PDP for some prebends; who will stand with you? I ask.
Oshaloto, Joseph Tade is a strategic communication expert.

http://www.facebook.com/tadejoe

Nigeria, where do your Economists Study their Econs? By; Oshaloto Joseph Tade. 

Nigeria, where do your Economists Study their Econs? 

By Oshaloto, Joseph Tade
There is an ambush which a dysfunctional Nigerian structure – by implication, the government – has sets on the path of the citizens’ conscience and dignity. 
The right to the DIGNITY of HUMAN PERSON is key if the need to extract and profit from the priceless resources inside of our population matters. And it does. Simple economics presupposes the need for a give and take especially when there is a legal obligation to do so. I stand on this premise, therefore, to argue that the Nigerian government must fulfill its obligations to the entire workforce – the employed and the unemployed must not suffer the same socioeconomic indignity. Workers condition of service must reflect a realistic commitment to current realities and their positive potentials.  
If a citizen would at least work, access to quality and dignified meal for them and their dependants must not be a luxury that only a corrupt privilege can procure. 
Nigeria, you have stripped your citizens bare of their conscience and dignity the moment their employment statuses no longer guarantee them stable personal economics. They can’t even judge your profligacies because you have structured their personal economics with a nexus of impossible corruption. 
Where exactly do your economics read their economics? 
Where do your policymakers train? 
Nothing frustrates my desire to love trust and believe in Nigeria than the facts that everything about her insanity is being denied, and conspiratorial silence on things that really matter. 
It is sickening that you have morphed us into a community of self deceivers which pretends about and deny our impossible realities. 
And you led us into this o Nigeria. 
Look, the only collateral for this warped system – which sadly is our second most deadly experiment, our current structure being the first – that is available to our critical majority, by this I mean the masses and not the one percenters, is the endemic corruption. 
The corporate denial of Nigeria’s impossible path to legitimate survival betrays our ‘efforts’ to take on our monsters. And it freaks me out. Because it is hypocrisy undiluted.
Nigerians in the majority earn wages that can never realistically cater to their basic needs. The wage calibration is so false that ‘alternative’ means of survival becomes a given. 
How many desperate goats can you catch? Not many, right? Then it is time to de-goat the workforce through realistic reward system.  
I sometimes get the urge to lash at  some private hirers for their criminally unrealistic remunerations. But I tell myself to quit smoking hypocrisy. If I have not said much in protesting the government which rode on my approval and goodwill to power, what moral rights have I to reprimand an obviously profitist private establishment?
As long as hardworking citizens’ wages will not cope with BASIC needs such as healthcare, balanced and regular meal with a decent accommodation, we lie about our progress, about our knowledge. We lie about our dreams and everything. And truth is not in us. 

 

Oshaloto, Joseph Tade is a strategic communications expert. He prefers basic economics and insists on socioeconomic justice in Nigeria. 
18th September, 2017

British Academy opens today. 

I am delighted to be able to inform you that the British Academy has today opened a new funding scheme for Visiting Fellowships https://www.britac.ac.uk/visiting-fellowships. 

 

These Visiting Fellowships provide academics based in any country overseas (and active at any career stage and in any discipline within the humanities and the social sciences) with the opportunity to be based at a UK higher education or other research institution of their choice for up to six months. Visiting Fellows will work with colleagues at UK host institutions in order to develop new research collaborations and/or deepen existing partnerships. 

 

We expect to award approximately 60 Visiting Fellowships through this current call. Awards of up to £33,000 are available, to include a contribution of 50% of the total award to enable the UK institution to host the Visiting Fellow.

 

Suitable candidates for the Visiting Fellowships include researchers active within any discipline within the humanities or the social sciences. They may be talented early career scholars who have only recently obtained their PhD degree; mid-career researchers; or established academics with a considerable track-record of achievement. Candidates need not necessarily apply to develop collaboration with UK scholars active within the same discipline. These Fellowships are open also to applicants who wish to work with UK colleagues in other areas or disciplines (including scholars within the natural, medical, or engineering sciences), in a cross- or inter-disciplinary way.

 

I would be most grateful if you could share details of this opportunity with your own research offices, colleagues, and contacts overseas.

 

For further information you can see the funding bulletin below.

 

If you have any questions, please do contact the Academy at +44 (0) 20 7969 5220 or internationalgrants@britac.ac.uk. 

End. 
You may reach Tade on +2348031551786 for assistance. 

The Government, the Schools and a Culture Incompetence. By Oshaloto, Joseph Tade 

Below is what a first generation university gives as notification for a postgraduate admission; 
“This is to inform you that u’ve been offered provisional admission into XYZ, PG Sch. Collect ur letter at SPGS ABC or at DEF campus 4 XXX & XXX.”
End of quote. 
I’m beyond offended that our Ivory Towers which should set the standard for excellence in all things including official communications continuously handle their businesses in this manner.
If a university should bother less about the content and manner of its correspondences, what justification do we have for bashing the rouges in our various government houses?
What moral rights do we have in calling out Prez. Muhammadu Buhari’s media gang led by Mr. Femi Adesina for putting up a puerile documentary?
It is certainly not beyond any academic institution worth its salt to hire competent hands to handle its communications. The inhibitions of TSA notwithstanding. 
This is a sort of development that emboldens nincompoops to deride people who have diligently worked to achieve excellence. It is counterproductive to resign to mediocrity in that people no longer see the need to improve themselves. Our universities must insist on better ways of doing things. 
And by the way, I have received reports that even the said admission list is nowhere available on the institution’s website, neither is it available on the candidates dashboards at the time of writing this piece. 
The whole thing reeks of a dangerous culture official levity, mediocrity and wantonness. It reminds one of how officials in a former administration reportedly withdrew humongous amount of money with suya wraps.
We can and must do better.
Oshaloto, Joseph Tade writes, speaks, acts and travels.

A Jonathan’s corruption NOT an Excuse for a Buhari’s Ineptitude. By Oshaloto, Joseph Tade 

Grossly disingenuous is the position held by certain bloc of Prez. Buhari’s support base.

This position of their’s is somewhat an ‘obligation’ to discount every single goof made by the presidency. 

While I know and expect that one’s support base should stand strong in one’s defense, I expect that our loyalty must be aimed at the ultimate good of the country. This cannot be said of many supporters of Prez. Buhari who I’ve interacted with.

To my horror, I find that some of these guys would rather have a totally messed up country than have the leader called out.

I find it very baffling that quite an intolerable number of young people – who should normally accept nothing short of excellent leadership – always seem unreasonably satisfied with what appears to be ineptitude of this administration.

The strength of their argument is hinged on the extent of this administration’s incompetence rather than its competence. They say it is less dangerous than theft.

Like it scares me, it should bother any patriotic Nigerian with a modicum of conscience that though certain Nigerian Youths admit that the leadership of their country is consistently getting things wrong, they still insist that that is the way things should and must go.

I have no argument or defense for the irredeemability of the corruption of previous administration – particularly Prez. Jonathan’s. As a matter of fact, I hold the opinion that every past president of this country should be made to give a comprehensive account of their stewardship. They should be sanctioned and divested of every item they illegally acquired.

This being said, to begin to excuse poor performance on the pretext that past leaders were corrupt is a troubling indication of our unwillingness as youth to make our leaders to imbibe excellence.

A Jonathan’s corruption is not a justification for a Buhari’s ineptitude.

It amounts to making a caricature of our dream of a great nation – a Nigerian of our dream – when we begin to hail the badness of Prez. Buhari’s administration as less deadly than Jonathan’s corruption.

Weeks ago, I penned a short update on my social media handles where I clearly stated that what Nigeria has lost and still loses to incompetence is costlier than we are willing to admit. The losses we suffer today cannot be divorced from the compromises we have accepted in the past.

In fact, incompetence is in my opinion the worst form of corruption.

As I conclude this piece, I wish to point out that I do not believe little minds exist on this platform. But should any mind consider this an affront on some political deity which no one should disagree with, I advise such a mind gets itself some cool wine.

Clearly, mine is a loyalty to the Federal Republic of Nigeria.

Anything or anyone who stands in the way of her growth and prosperity will not escape my critical pen. With love of course.

May Nigeria succeed.

Happy new year.

Oshaloto, Joseph Tade is a Nigerian.
Reach him at oshalototade@yahoo.com
Or leave your comments on oshalototade.wordpress.com.

What Paul Martin said about Us in Africa. By; Oshaloto Joseph Tade. 

WaPo had on 19th December, 2017 credited the opinions below to a former Canadian prime Minister, Paul Martin. 
“More than 10 million young Africans enter the workforce each year, yet the continent creates only about three million jobs annually.
” That gap heralds a future of poverty and migration that will reverberate around the world.
“Even if displacement from war and famine recedes, millions of Africans will still feel compelled to leave in search of better lives, regardless of the barriers in their paths.
“The only way to keep this from happening is to guarantee job growth and living conditions that will enable them to stay where they want to stay — at home.”

End of quote.
Enters Tade, 
The gentleman former PM’s submission, again, shows how commonsensically the African migration problem can/not be addressed.
I once noted in a forum that a man is more attached to a land where he is prospering. People in their active lives are a lot less mindful of the home-is-home rhetoric until they can lay hold on a certain measure of success. Of course no one should clap for me on this. It is commonsense.
I sad. I ache. I ache when governments, particularly the Nigerian government – who in my opinion has too little dose of conscience – blames the young emigrating folks for being impatient or greedy.
In all honesty and due regard to the government of the federal republic, I believe that a government that cannot provide a service as basic as water (omi, ruwa, mmiri, du l’eau) – even in its capital city or its coastal towns – for its citizens has lost its moral rights to apportion any blame on those who seek responsible governance elsewhere.
As a matter responsibility which is evidently lacking, every single soul that our nation loses to emigration must be accounted for by the government. The family must be adequately compensated. Figures of such loses must be conspicuously written against the leadership of the country in whose time such carnage occurs. 
It is laughable that many in government pretend they do not know that the mass exodus of our young able bodies are a direct scorecard of the government’s criminal negligence and/or incompetence.
May it ring out that unless there’s a believable level of decisiveness on the part of the government to ensure quality life for the citizens, harvesting bodies on the Mediterranean, Sahara and elsewhere may have just begun. 
Man would stake his own life to pursue his hopes no matter how dangerous.
Be believable O Nigeria. Quit dashing our hopes.
May the souls of these fallen heroes rest in peace. 
Oshaloto, Joseph Tade.

December 20th, 2017 💥

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